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Health and Social Care - Help to stay at home and living in the community

We want to help people stay living safely at home for as long as possible and there are a range of solutions available to help.

There is a wide range of equipment available to help you maintain your independence:

  • simple equipment, such as bath boards which sit across a bath, grab rails around the house, raised toilet seats, chair raisers, etc.;
  • specialist equipment, such as bath lifts, hoists, pressure cushions and mattresses, etc.; and
  • adaptations, such as widening doors, ramps for wheelchairs, stair lifts, level access showers, etc.

Simple equipment

If you are interested in simple equipment, you can:

  • Visit an advice centre, such as at a local branch of AgeUK
  • Use our online assessment which helps you work out what your needs are and what equipment might help with these
  • Visit an equipment retailer, i.e. shops and businesses selling equipment (remember to look out for the 'accredited retailer' logo).

Some people may be able to get simple equipment free of charge through Adult Social Care or the NHS.  Contact your local Adult Social Care office for more information.  You will need to be assessed as eligible for equipment and will then be given an equipment prescription.

This prescription can then be taken to any accredited retailer and exchanged for the item you need.  The prescription will provide you with a basic item but you can pay extra to upgrade this to a more expensive one in a colour or design of your choice.  The equipment will come with fitting instructions but some retailers will provide a free fitting service.

Specialist equipment

If you need specialist equipment, these will need to be arranged through Adult Social Care or the NHS, so please contact your local Adult Social Care office for more information. 

If you have any concerns or queries about your specialist equipment please contact us on 0300 303 8625.  If a fault develops outside of office hours an answer machine message will provide instructions of how to get further assistance.

Adaptations

If you need adaptations to be made to your home, these can be arranged through Adult Social Care or the NHS.  If the work required is small, this may be provided by your landlord or the council.  If major work is needed to your home then you may be able to get a grant to help pay for the work.  You may be asked to contribute to the cost of the work for a major adaptation.  Contact your local Adult Social Care office for more information. 

Returning equipment

If you no longer need your equipment you can contact us on 0300 303 8625 to make arrangements to have it collected or for details of where you can drop it off.  Items issued through a prescription are classed as non-returnable and are excluded from the collection service.

The delivery of a hot community meal is a key element in achieving independence and improving the quality of life for the older people of Cumbria

Cumbria County Council is working with local independent meal suppliers to try and introduce a wider range of food options. New meals services, including hot, chilled and frozen meals on wheels, are being introduced across the whole of Cumbria over the coming year which will offer more choice and more locally based options to choose from.

This new service involves local businesses including pubs, cafes and luncheon clubs working together with Cumbria County Council to provide a greater selection of choices for members of the public. These will be non-subsidised food options including a variety of meals on wheels, luncheon clubs and dining opportunities across Cumbria.

For more information about how you can access this new service, please contact your local Adult Social Care team.

If you need adaptations to be made to your home, these can be arranged through Adult Social Care or the NHS.  If the work required is small, this may be provided by your landlord or the council.  If major work is needed to your home then you may be able to get a grant to help pay for the work.  You may be asked to contribute to the cost of the work for a major adaptation.  Contact your local Adult Social Care office for more information.

What is reablement?

Reablement aims to help people regain their independence following an illness, injury, disability or loss of personal support network.  Reablement is a short term service the length of which will depend on individual need. During this period customers will not be charged for the Reablement service.

The Reablement service will work with individuals to help them to do things for themselves rather than do things for them.  It will focus on an individual's strengths and abilities and help them build up their confidence in doing things for themselves such as:

  • getting up, washed and dressed;
  • preparing meals and snacks;
  • getting about in and out of their home;
  • doing household tasks like shopping, pension and laundry; and
  • getting involved in social and leisure activities.

Who is reablement for?

Reablement is for people:
  • aged 18 or over and living in Cumbria
  • who would benefit from reablement and be able to regain at least some of their independence;
  • who live in their own home or would be able to live in the community with some support.

Carers may also be able to have reablement to help them to continue to look after someone.

Reablement may not be for people who:

  • need specialist rehabilitation - there are other services called Short Term Intervention (STINT) or Community Rehabilitation Services or Early Community Response Team [ECRT] or Unscheduled Services, which provide this; or
  • do not want or are not prepared to engage with reablement.

People receiving reablement do not have to be assessed as eligible under Fair Access to Care Services (FACS) eligibility criteria (to be amended following the Care Bill) as for the neighbourhood care independence programme.

How long is reablement provided for?

Reablement is a short term service the length of which will depend on individual need.

Is there a charge for reablement?

Customers will not be charged for the Reablement service. Equipment and adaptations up to a cost of £ 1,000, and Telecare or assistive technology, provided as part of the reablement episode would also be provided free of charge.

However, there may be a charge for:

  • other services an individual receives during a reablement episode; or
  • ongoing support following the end of a reablement episode.

These chargeable services will also be subject to an assessment of need and Fair Access to Care Services (FACS) eligibility criteria (to be amended following the Care Bill).  If a customer or a carer has concerns about their support and the assessment process we can tell them about independent organisations they can speak to for support with this process.

Where is reablement available?

Reablement is available across Cumbria for new customers to Adult Social Care and existing customers who experience a change in circumstances or have a review of their services.  

How do I request reablement?

You can request reablement for an individual (subject to availability as above) through your nearest Adult Social Care office.

Requests should only be made with the consent of the individual.

For more information on the Reablement Service

For strategic information about Reablement contact:

Susan Renucci , Service Development Manager , Tel: 07836 368810, Email: susan.renucci@cumbria.gov.uk or

Colin Phipps, Service Development Manager, Tel: 07968545955, Email: colin.phipps@cumbria.gov.uk

For routine operational enquiries please contact your nearest Adult Social Care office. Contact details can also be found at the end of the Reablement Factsheet.

Home care (domiciliary care) is practical help with your personal care which can be provided in your own home to help you to remain independent and improve your quality of life.

This is usually help with day-to-day personal tasks for example

 getting up
 dressing
 washing
 going to bed
 help with eating

The amount and type of support you receive depends on what is decided following an assessment of your needs.

Hospital discharges are conducted in accordance with the NHS and Community Care Act.

The hospital will tell us if you need an assessment to start or continue with your services on your return home.

Acute hospital discharges

We then have to complete an assessment of what social care eligible needs you may have and whether a package of care is required in line with the Delayed Discharges Act.

We will work with you and the hospital staff to arrange your aftercare and ensure that you have the necessary help and support in place for when you return home. 

Community hospital discharges

Sometimes you may be admitted to a local, community hospital rather than an acute hospital. You may also be transferred to a community hospital for rehabilitation following an acute hospital stay.

Discharge from a community hospital is not covered by the Delayed Discharges Act, but we will work together with health care staff to enable you to leave hospital as soon as you are ready.

Interim care and reablement

We can provide a range of services that, following a holistic assessment, may meet your and your carers identified needs. Wherever possible, care will be provided in your own home via interim or intermediate care.  This involves a range of professionals working closely together to help you recover faster from illness. The service may include professionals from occupational therapy, physiotherapy, nursing and social work.

The reablement service will work to help you achieve the level of functionality that you enjoyed before your hospital admittance.  

These services are for a maximum of six weeks, but can be as little as one or two weeks depending on your needs. 

Short term care

It may be that you need a short stay in some other accommodation just while you recover. 

What if I have already returned home and then find I need some support?

If having returned home you find you need some help to rebuild your confidence or ability to undertake personal care or daily living tasks then you can contact your local Adult Social Care office to make your own referral.

Assistive technology is the name given to a wide range of technology which helps people to be as independent as possible.  Telecare is an example of assistive technology, but there are many other examples.

Telecare

Telecare is a flexible, telephone-based, alarm system which helps you live independently in your own home for as long as possible.

Telecare is based around a pendant worn around the neck or wrist.  This provides access to a 24-hour monitoring service offering an instant response at the touch of a button from anywhere in your home or garden.

Telecare can be linked to a series of alarms or sensors in key parts of your home offering an immediate early warning if something is wrong.  For example, telecare can have sensors to detect:

  • Falls - if you are at risk of falling or having seizures
  • Leaving a bed or chair - if you are at risk of falling
  • Smoke - for fire risk
  • Carbon monoxide - particularly if you have gas fired equipment
  • Natural gas - if a gas fire or cooker has been left on unlit
  • Temperature extremes - to detect heat which might be a fire risk, or cold if hypothermia is a risk
  • Flood - if a tap in a sink or bath has been left on
  • Door opening - if someone is at risk if they leave home

Telecare is available through Adult Social Care and also privately through local providers.  Please contact your local Adult Social Care office for more information. 

Just Checking

Just Checking is a system which is used for short periods of time to help Adult Social Care work out how best to support you.  It has a series of sensors in rooms and on doors and can monitor your personal routine.  If you have a regular routine, support can be arranged to work with that routine helping you to be as independent as possible.  If you do not have a regular routine, you may need more support.  Please contact your local Adult Social Care office for more information.

A Shared Lives carer is a person who offers accommodation and support and/or personal care in their own home under the supervision and support of a Shared Lives scheme

Shared lives

Cumbria County Council wants to help more people retain their independence and control over their lives. 

The council believes the best way to achieve this is by recognising that each community in Cumbria is unique and each neighbourhood has the skills and knowledge needed to make lasting changes to people's lives. 

Managed by the Cumbria Community Foundation and funded by Cumbria County Council, the Neighbourhood Care Independence Programme (NCIP) provides a range of practical help and advice services for adults of any age, but in particular for older people.  Its aim is to provide people with support and advice on issues such as:

  • handy person support for minor DIY tasks such as changing light bulbs, mowing the lawn or shopping;
  • linking to friendship groups through good neighbourhood schemes and telephone contact for those who are lonely or isolated;
  • helping people to join in with social and leisure groups in the local community;
  • helping people to set up their own support such as finding and paying for equipment and support services;
  • hearing-aid maintenance and support 'drop ins';
  • short-term support after a spell in hospital; and
  • support for carers

Volunteering Opportunities

If you would like to become involved in the Neighbourhood Care Independence Programme (NCIP), and are able to give some of your time and skills to help people in your community, a range of volunteer opportunities and roles are available. Training and ongoing support will be provided.

For advice on any of these services or to volunteer, call:

0844 967 1885 for Carlisle, Eden, Barrow and South Lakeland.

0844 384 3843 for Allerdale and Copeland or contact your local Adult Social Care office.

A Direct Payment is money we can give you to enable you to arrange and be in control of the services you choose to meet your needs.  Direct Payments can be used flexibly and offer you greater choice of the support you receive.  For example, you can use a Direct Payment to:

  • employ your own staff;
  • design  your own service that fits your choices and needs;
  • buy equipment that better fits your lifestyle;
  • arrange your own respite care to offer you or your carer a break;
  • pay self-employed care staff or a care agency to provide you directly with services; or
  • a combination of any of these.

To request a Direct Payment, please speak to your social worker or contact your local Adult Social Care office.  To have a Direct Payment, you must have an assessment of need which shows you are eligible for care and support from us.  We will work with you to agree how you will use your Direct Payment and what you will spend it on to meet your assessed needs.

Once your Direct Payments are approved, we will usually make these using a prepaid card account.  This is a bank account we set up for you into which we pay your Direct Payments every four weeks.  If you have been assessed as having to make a contribution towards the cost of your support, you will need to pay your contribution into your prepaid card account.

If you are considering using your Direct Payment to employ your own staff, we recommend you seek independent advice and support.  To help you, we have a list of accredited providers of Direct Payment advice and support (PDF 277kb) who can help you with:

  • setting up to employ your own staff;
  • recruiting your own staff;
  • ongoing support to employ and manage your own staff;
  • run a payroll; and
  • manage payments using your Direct Payment.

Once your Direct Payments have started, you can use these to arrange and pay for the care and support services you have agreed with your social worker.

If you have had an assessment of need from us which shows you are eligible for care and support funded by us, there are different ways in which this can be arranged:

  • Direct Payment - we can pay you money, usually through a prepaid card account, which you can then use to arrange your own care and support services;
  • Individual Service Fund - we can pay money, through a prepaid card account, to a service provider of your choice - they will then manage the money on your behalf arranging the care and support services you choose;
  • Care managed services - we can arrange your care and support services for you; or
  • A combination of these.

An Individual Service Fund gives you greater flexibility, choice and control of the care and support you receive compared to services we can arrange for you.  It has many of the advantages of a Direct Payment except that with an Individual Service Fund, you do not have to manage the money. 

With an Individual Service Fund, you choose a service provider who will provide you with care and support and manage the fund on your behalf.  You can ask your chosen provider to arrange for services from other providers too.

To request an Individual Service Fund, please speak to your social worker or contact your local Adult Social Care office.  We will carry out an assessment of your needs and then work with you to agree how you will use your Individual Service Fund and what you will spend it on to meet your assessed needs.

Once your Individual Service Fund is approved, we will make this available to your chosen provider using a prepaid card account.  This is a bank account we set up into which we pay your fund every four weeks.  If you have been assessed as having to make a contribution towards the cost of your support, you will need to pay your contribution into your prepaid card account.

Once your Individual Service Fund payments have started, you can work with your chosen provider to use these to arrange and pay for the care and support services you have agreed with your social worker.